Saturday, January 12, 2013

IHCC: Potluck!

The project for using up older stuff in the freezer led to a little leg of goat needing to be cooked. A bit of web searching turned up Jaffrey's recipe for Pakistani Goat Curry. This is reportedly from At Home with Madhur Jaffrey, a book I don't yet have, but have ordered because there have been so many tasty-looking recipes from that book posted for IHCC.

This curry is really easy to make and the resulting sauce is quite delicious. My little goat leg (from a kid, I think) was about half the size asked for the recipe. To compensate, I used most of the spices, cutting back only the liquid part. I couldn't cut my leg into chunks or even disjoint it, so I just cooked it whole in the pan and pulled the meat from the bones when it was done.

You begin by sautéing cinnamon sticks, cardamom pods, and sliced onion. When the onion begins to brown, garlic and ginger are added. Stir that around, then add the goat, some turmeric, ground coriander, and cayenne. Stir this for a few minutes, then add a bit of water, which you then boil off to make a nice paste for browning the meat. Now you add more water, cover, and simmer gently for an hour. Then you add potatoes and cook another thirty minutes until the potatoes are done. At this point the sauce was still a bit watery, so I thickened it with a bit of potato starch. Serve and eat.


The side dish is Gingery Cabbage and Peas, a Gujarati recipe from Flavours of India (p67). We liked this a lot, although not especially with this particular curry. I'm trying to widen my repertoire of vegetable side dishes and this was another new one.

This post is shared with this week's I Heart Cooking Clubs.

3 comments:

  1. I love the way this recipe starts==sauteing the spices. I can almost smell the wonderful aromas. Looks good, Kaye.

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  2. This looks delicious! I especially love the addition of potatoes in most curries. Would be great eaten with plain white basmati rice!

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  3. I haven't had goat in years. Love how the spices are 'cooked' first and then everything else is added in.

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